electric utility

CT Electricity Choice – Can You Save on Electricity?

The Connecticut Office of Consumer Counsel recently called for the end of electricity choice in Connecticut. The OCC says electricity choice doesn’t save money. Retailers say you can save. But what’s the reality?

We’ll give you both sides of the argument. We’ll tell you why Connecticut electricity rates are so high. And we’ll show how you really can save on your United Illuminating or Eversource bill when you switch suppliers.

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21 Tips to Manage Your Home Utilities in a Hurricane

Harvey, Maria, Sandy, Katrina. Just the names of these powerful hurricanes evoke strong memories of devastation and flooding. There are a lot of articles on hurricane preparedness for you and for your pets. But what about your home? Learn what you must know to manage your home’s utilities during a hurricane or a flood. Hurricane season peaks in early September, but flooding can occur any time of the year. Make sure you are prepared!

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Electricity Explained: From Flow to Dough

America’s demand for electricity is huge, totaling 18% of the world’s electricity consumption in 2015. We take for granted that electricity will be there when we turn on the lights or crank up the air conditioner. We can’t imagine life without it. But, have you ever wondered how electricity is made, or where it comes from, or how we get it the instant we want it?

Beginning in 1879, electricity was first sold in the United States by the California Electric Light Company in San Francisco which produced and sold enough electricity to run about 20 electric lights.  Since then the use of electricity has grown exponentially. Fast forward to 2016 and Americans consumed about 3.85 trillion kilowatthours (kWh) of electricity according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. In this post we cover the basics about what powers this huge amount of consumption, the sources of electricity in the US, and the role of deregulation.

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Energy Trends To Watch In 2018

Where are electricity rates headed in 2018? You’ve likely heard rumors about tax cuts reducing your utility bill, but what are the other variables that will make your rates go up or down? Let’s examine the most important energy factors that will contribute to retail electricity price movements over the next 12 months.

UPDATE: Looking for 2019 Energy Trends? See Energy Trends to Watch in 2019.

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What’s the Difference Between a Utility and an Electricity Provider?

When it’s time to choose an electricity plan, it can be really confusing picking your way between all the options available and the host of initials and terms.

One of the most common sticking points for electricity customers is what, exactly, the difference is between an electricity provider (also called REP, CRES, or electric supplier) and an electric utility (also called a TDSP, TDU, or EDU). They’re both vital to the success of electricity deregulation, but they play very different roles. Understanding how they fit together can make a big difference in your overall confidence as an electricity customer trying to shop for the best electricity plan.

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What is deregulation?

Efficiency, renewable energy, and deregulation are among the most pressing concerns for utility customers across the country.

Although energy efficiency and using renewable electricity sources are well-understood concepts, electricity deregulation is still cloaked in a great deal of mystery despite having its modern roots in legislation from the early 1990s.

When people talk about electricity deregulation, what they’re really discussing is a process where the electricity generator and the electricity distributor are uncoupled and customers are given the power to choose their own electricity providers. Your local utility will always be the same, even in a deregulated area, but your electricity provider can be anyone certified by your state who offers electricity plans to your city or town.

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